lizzelizzel

venusmilk:

Norman Lindsay (1879–1969), Young Man Being Watched by a Harpy, a Sphinx and a Mermaid  c.1939
(source)

venusmilk:

Norman Lindsay (1879–1969), Young Man Being Watched by a Harpy, a Sphinx and a Mermaid  c.1939

(source)

(via riddlesphinx)

— 3 days ago with 194 notes
volcanology:

Portrait of Marguerite Khnopff - Fernand Khnopff 1890

volcanology:

Portrait of Marguerite Khnopff - Fernand Khnopff 1890

(via candyshroom)

— 1 week ago with 463 notes
bohemianwaif:

"séance", by stephen mackey…

bohemianwaif:

"séance", by stephen mackey…

(via candyshroom)

— 10 months ago with 2597 notes
binnorie:

Nicola Samori | J. V. 

binnorie:

Nicola Samori | J. V. 

— 10 months ago with 247 notes
willigula:

Orestes Pursued by the Furies by John Singer Sargent, 1921

willigula:

Orestes Pursued by the Furies by John Singer Sargent, 1921

(via swrd-play)

— 10 months ago with 430 notes
Portrait of Madame Sennones by IngresI’m not sure how I never came across this portrait before. This internet reproduction doesn’t do justice to it compared to the print I recently viewed in a book. Not as doe eyed and vacant as his other paintings, slightly parted lips, eye contact, filigreed lace like an overly complicated insect, soft ringed fingers.

Portrait of Madame Sennones by Ingres

I’m not sure how I never came across this portrait before. This internet reproduction doesn’t do justice to it compared to the print I recently viewed in a book. Not as doe eyed and vacant as his other paintings, slightly parted lips, eye contact, filigreed lace like an overly complicated insect, soft ringed fingers.

— 10 months ago with 2 notes

gurodogboyfriend:

The Great Red Dragon Paintings, by William Blake.

And behold a great red dragon, having seven heads and ten horns, and seven crowns upon his heads. And his tail drew the third part of the stars of heaven, and did cast them to the earth." — (Rev. 12:3-4)

(Source: groteschuli, via lupevision)

— 1 year ago with 1484 notes

likeafieldmouse:

Nicola Samori

From an interview with the artist:

Your paintings often have the faces of your subjects peeled off. What is it that gives a person their identity? What is the most important layer?

I don’t think painting is the best way to give a person their figurative identity. Peeling off the faces makes it possible for all the neglected parts of a representation to come to light and, as far as I am concerned, they all work even better without any kind of control. I don’t know what it is that gives a person their identity, it’s such complex matter. I definitely don’t think a portrait can eventually give it back because you can always perceive its author behind its eyes; well, maybe others’ portraits (even their removal, why not?) can outline the author’s identity.

How do you achieve the layered effects in your paintings?

By feeding my creation day by day and waiting for each work to discover its own rules. It happens sometimes. Generally I like burying many works on the same support until the conveyance of these dull forms becomes quite intense and palpable. Then I start a destructuring step by simply using my hands or a knife.

There is a darkness in your work. Where does this come from?

Each form attempt stems from a very dark plan and only comes to light with great difficulty. To me the problem is not to understand where darkness does come from, rather what can come out of it.

I think that working with light colors is more difficult and, in fact, I’m not very good at it. 

What are your beliefs about the nature of mankind? What gives our lives meaning against the eventual death and decay that claims us all?

I think man is simply against nature, kind of a virus refined through ages and ages of evolution.

I think that artistic research perceived as consolation and competitiveness is the demon that gives meaning to my days. Everyone has to discover their own.

What are some of your obsessions? What makes you happy?

The body is an obsession, I’m unable to get over the fact that I live in one, death is another obsession of mine, painting another one.

Read the interview in its entirety here.

(via its-called-art)

— 1 year ago with 1626 notes
c0ssette:

Bronzino, detail, Portrait of a Young Man (1530s)

c0ssette:

Bronzino, detail, Portrait of a Young Man (1530s)

(via c0ssette)

— 1 year ago with 2694 notes